Uppercuts

Uppercuts are, just like the name implies, punches delivered to the underside of the opponent’s jaw. Like the other power punches, they are most effectively delivered within a combination or as a swift counter to an opponent’s punch.

As with a hook, an uppercut is a fixed arm mid-to-close range shot and has the greatest chance of success when not telegraphed.

The feet and torso action for a lead uppercut is similar to that of a lead hook and the body action for the rear uppercut is similar to the straight rear hand punch or cross.

Please Note: I’m a southpaw (left handed) so if you write or throw a ball with your right hand stand with your dominant hand (right) to the rear and left foot forwards

Lead Uppercut

  • Achieve a loaded-up position with your weight over your punching-side leg and your shoulders more squared (approximately 90 degrees) up to your opponent than your normal boxing stance. This process MUST occur with a minimum of telegraphing. Finding yourself in this loaded position as a result of just throwing the cross or slipping a punch would be most effective starting point for the lead uppercut.
  • Simultaneously tense your core and exhale sharply through your nose whilst throwing the punch, this will help improve speed and power.
  • Push off the punching-side leg to initiate hip and torso twist towards the target.
  • Whip the arm (which should be upwards but not quite vertical) in a scything action at the target (the underside of your opponent’s jaw), bracing it with your bicep to reduce power loss and to keep it from extending.
  • Only clench the fist moments before impact to aid speed and reduce fatigue.
  • The follow-through position with your glove (and where your glove ends up if you miss) should be approximately eight to 12 inches above the target.
  • Retract the glove to the defensive guard position as quickly as possible and return to your original stance.

Rear Uppercut

  • Simultaneously tense your core and exhale sharply through your nose whilst throwing the punch, this will help improve speed and power.
  • Push from rear foot to help initiate an approximate 90-degree hip rotation towards the target avoiding excessive forwards lean.
  • From your tight defensive guard fire your glove in a near-vertical arc towards the target (the underside of the jaw) with a fixed arm angle using your bicep to brace the arm.
  • Only clench the fist moments before impact to aid speed and reduce fatigue.
  • The follow-through position with your glove (and where your glove ends up if you miss) should be approximately eight to 12 inches above the target.
  • Retract the glove to the defensive guard position as quickly as possible and return to your original stance.